BP oil spill response less than satisfactory

Oil Soaked Bird

Fishermen are hired as cleanup crew, while being signed to gag orders, so as not to retaliate with lawsuit or exposure when the brunt of truth clarifies that their livelihoods have been forever coated in an oil sludge.

With the oceans reeking the brunt of human havoc, whether it be the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a grand accumulation of human waste traveling along course the ocean currents, or the six to one ratio of plastic to plankton weighted by mass in the world’s oceans, or the high levels of mercury found in many or most fisheries and large-bred sea life, or the bleaching of coral reefs, or the acidification and widening of dead zones, or most notably of recent events, the explosion of the oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, billowing an inexhaustible rupture of an oil volcano into the deep blue, washing onto sensitive wetlands and feeding and nursing grounds for countless flora and fauna, the oceans are in most pleading need of good hope and healthy response from human activity.  The oceans have been marked the whipping boy of where we are incapable of holding responsibility.

BP’s response to the disaster has been anything less than worthy, orchestrating presentations to keep its commercial image untattered as possible, sustaining its pioneering approach to moving beyond petroleum.  BP reports on the lengths of coastline protected, the numbers of workers and cleanup crews, the effective dispersants thinning the plumes of billowing oil, and so on and so forth.  They speak most notably at press conferences and interviews about the strengthening of safety regulations, and orchestrating foolproof drilling systems.  The reality of BP’s approach to cleaning up the spill reflects a devout sincerity to image, rather than depth.  They have attempted to plug the rupture with car tires, golf balls, rope, and human hair.  The dispersants used are proven toxins, with no knowledge of their long-term effects in ocean habitats.  In attempt to save birds and wetland species, the dispersants exchange its marination of toxicity for passing fisheries, which will then serve as fodder and meal for the wetland birds.  Fishermen are hired as cleanup crew, while being signed to gag orders, so as not to retaliate with lawsuit or exposure when the brunt of truth clarifies that their livelihoods have been forever coated in an oil sludge.

After such a devastation as the oil rig explosion was, with no end foreseeable in the near future, with the most optimistic hope of cleanup as a meager ten percent of the oil that has already gushed unwillfully into the wet blue universe, one’s last logical response would be to drill for more oil off the coast of any land, foreign or domestic.  When human ethics that are backed by common logic are left by the wayside for the exchange of most desperate capitalistic efforts, and further drilling is our answer to an environmental, economic, and energy disaster, we have flagstaffed our own pitiable rock bottom.

Shell Oil is poised to travel north to the Alaskan Arctic, and claim virgin territories off the coastline as prime real estate for drilling.  Originally, with the green light from the Obama administration, Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar issued permits for new oil wells to be tapped.  With resistant pressure, the permits have been presently postpones for six months, a token of time allowance, with the hope that citizen disgruntlement will subside within the allotted window.

Domestic response to the oil disaster in the Gulf has been nothing less than met with a blind eye.  Technological innovation and transformation of energy supply has been left in stagnation, in which accident ridden technology operates a mile beneath the ocean surface, and drills another three miles further into the earthy crust.  As a proud American tradition, the oilman is pioneer of the country as the romantic cowboy.  Though a country sinking in tradition and self-appointed prowess, America must reevaluate its broken image, but most importantly its depth of operation.

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