Global Walker
Ever dream of moving to far away land and becoming part of something new?

Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland. He brings us insights on the project along with perspectives and musings on the world around us.

Around the Globe

Forging for Food and the Unconscious Market

October 27, 2010

Conscious Food

Perhaps we read that the product was made in China or Indonesia, or grown in Peru, but this is as far as the marketplace allows us to see.

They stood like enchanted children of the sun, their liliput golden bodies grouped under the beechwood shade. Emblems of a modest beauty, representatives of immortality— their seasonal stems and caps of tangerine. They rose with a warm flesh tone, situated at the center of death and decay.

They are the reason for regeneration.

I bent low, and identified the mushrooms as chanterelles—“ edibility, excellent,” my book read. I pulled out my knife, and cut the stem just below the surface of the soil, making sure not to draw out the entire body of the mushroom—a wild foraging ethic that allows the mushroom to bloom again. My bag was brimmed with various edibles—two large saffron milk caps, several wood blewits, and various kinds of boletes. I had spent the better half of the afternoon gathering mushrooms from the woods for the evening’ s meal, collecting from the limited selection provided each season.

Mushroom Meal

I cut the stem just below the surface of the soil, making sure not to draw out the entire body of the mushroomPhoto by Rick Adair

I haven’ t foraged for food all that much. I have picked berries before, and perhaps found an apple or two growing in the wild, but have typically regarded the marketplace as the source of all food. I had accepted the seeming reality that food was a human good, cultivated entirely by the handiwork of man. In fact, I saw every product upon every store shelf as a product of human labor, rather than as a product of the land’ s labor. Land was not figured into the equation of supply and demand. The exchange of supply and demand began and ended within the marketplace walls; the package and label and price tag, these were the justified values of everyday needs.

Traditional understanding of economy is this: the marketplace is the entire scene of the supply and demand. Consumers buy products as the need—the continuity of demand— while the shelves are restocked with more of the same products—the continuity of supply. Whatever products are not demanded enough are eventually filtered out of the exchange, taken off the market altogether. Thus the market should naturally develop itself to provide the highest quality of goods at the best prices, or else they won’ t be demanded, and will then no longer exist. “ The market will sort itself out,” is the claim.

And it is by the labor of man that continues the exchange cycle. Perhaps we read that the product was made in China or Indonesia, or grown in Peru, but again, this is as far as the marketplace allows us to see. Our thought rarely travels beyond what that label reads—“ a product of Peru,” that is all. It fails to recognize not just the human labor that brings the product into its package and label, but primarily what makes that human labor possible.

It fails to recognize not just the human labor that brings the product into its package and label, but primarily what makes that human labor possible.

Behind every orderly exchange of supply and demand is the land that supplies the supply. Thus, every economy is a land-based economy, and is therefore not an inexhaustible exchange. There are now limits to what the source of supply (the land) may provide. The market won’ t just “ sort itself out,” because the land’ s own shelves are not restocked as quickly as the marketplace trains us to believe. I cut just the lower part of the mushroom stem because I knew it would “ restock” its supply more quickly, but I didn’ t convince myself that the supply of that mushroom was endless. It needs to regrow to do so—this takes time and labor by the land, which is to say that the economy is not land-based so much as it is labor-based. Its regeneration is the groundwork of economy.
Mushrooms

Mushrooms are symbolic of such regeneration, transforming the death and decay of the woods back into nourishment for new growth. But there are countless examples of nature’ s immortal economy, none of which have an endless supply without allowance for regeneration. The wild foraging not only pulled back the curtain of the marketplace, revealing the land and the labor of the land to be the foundation of every product’ s “ excellent edibility,” it pulled back the marketplace altogether. It got entirely rid of the package and label and price tag, and exposed the true source of supply.

What all this points to is a necessary reconstruction of economy, a sufficient transparency of product and supply source, and a holistic allowance of the land’ s regeneration. The mushrooms situated in the beechwood shade promoted not only their own individual growth, but the growth of the entire woods.

Global Walker

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland. He can be contacted at walker@globalwhisperer.com

Thoughts on Genetics from a Spinach Seed

October 16, 2010

Organic Gardening Scotland

Are Genetically Modified Foods Safe?

My fingertips turn white in the cold as I carefully sort through the spinach seeds that are to be used for next season’s planting. Glass jars crowd the shelves in the seed storage room, with each jar neatly labeled so as to identify which variety of seed is in which jar. As the winter season approaches, preparations in the fields and in the gardens move ahead. It is a foresight that is needed now in order to be ready later. In other words, I save seeds now so I can plant them when prime conditions allow. In the community in which I live, nearly all of the foods eaten today are because of the seeds that were saved from last season, which is to say seeds are the very core of our community.
Scotland Organic Farming

It is easy to be awed by the modesty of a seed, how something so small and insignificant can then rise to become a fashionable display of life, as if a vault of individuality is hidden somewhere beneath its tiny shell. I imagine the seed to be some starter point, an origin almost, which contains all the complexities of a living construct. Questions soon arise regarding the construct and composition of the seed—how it came to be, what it’s really made of, how it inherently knows to grow the way it does.

There seems to be a growing debate about these questions, a controversy really, in which the construct of life is called into question. Regarding seeds particularly, the gene structure seems to be the most controversial, in which science can actually manipulate the components of life, specify and modify them into an entirely new organism, or new lifeform. One side of the debate contends this practice is unethical, it is “playing God.” The other side counters that it is just a further exploration of science, and that it increases the yield and performance of crops.

The question in debate then becomes, Can the recipe of life be
scientifically compiled?

Now, this is a fascinating debate, but neither side seems to really hit the core of the issue. In this case, ethics are purely subjective and relative, and a debate concerning them would be much too inconclusive to continue. And scientific understanding does not comprehend the full picture of reality. Or does it?

The question in debate then becomes, Can the recipe of life be scientifically compiled?

If two seeds of the same class were compared, one genetically modified, the other from a wild landscape, their differences might appear undetectable. Their physical properties—at least when superficially assessed—might seem scientifically identical with each other. Even after they grow, any differences would most likely be indecipherable. However, upon further study of what really makes a seed a seed and a plant a plant, the physical properties as well as the gene construct don’t seem to satisfy as the entirety of a living construct. This is to say that the seed from the wild landscape is comprised of such things as history, substance, and worldliness that the formalities of a gene structure fall short of. Take for example the history of the seed. The seed did not just come to be out of nothingness, but is the product of roughly two-and-a-half billion years of evolution. I don’t suppose that backbone of being is found in any gene structure.

Zen and MotorCycle Maintenance

Robert M. Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Robert Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, reminds us that scientific instruments cannot detect excellence, worth, or goodness. These qualities are underlying truths to the physical form, they are very exact existences to life, but they are unknowns to scientific understanding. So, what all this means is that any genetically modified organism is actually a physical projection of the lifeform. It is not an actual lifeform, but the image or the illusion of the lifeform. According to what physical observation can detect, the genetically modified organism can function normally, and perhaps even perform better to some degree than a non-modified organism, but the very underlying truths to the physical form will be missing.

Perhaps this is why we are awed by the tiniest of seeds—not because we know it is a complex organization of genes, but because it is a modest module of life’s worldliness. The physical properties represent life, and can be easily replicated, while the underlying constructs of history, substance, and worldliness define life.

Perhaps this is why every outbreak of e coli food
poisoning in recorded history was caused by a genetically modified
food product.

Now, we can plant these genetically modified seeds just as we can plant those from the wild, they can grow to become food crops just as any other, and we can fill our appetites just the same. So what really does it matter if one does not have history or worldliness? It matters for a couple reasons, and they are not of small importance.

When an agricultural field becomes a smooth composition of the image or representation of a living crop, but fails to achieve the real thing, the landscape then becomes a mirage from here to the horizon. It is a qualityless landscape without any living substance. Another reason of importance is when these crops are harvested, processed into any number of food products, and then consumed. We are then filling our appetites with a projection of nature’s sustenance without being fed true substance. Perhaps this is why every outbreak of e coli food poisoning in recorded history was caused by a genetically modified food product. There is no underlying quality in that food product. This is also perhaps why the leading manufacturer of genetically modified crops, Monsanto, was the same company to develop the disreputable pesticides DDT and Agent Orange—just the image of protecting crops from pests was replicated, the real thing was not. I don’t imagine Monsanto’s intentions were ever as harsh as the products turned out to be, the same as they may intend only good things for genetically modified. The problem is that their scientific achievements do not comprehend the quality of the living form.

So, this doesn’t follow the commonly themed argument, “genetically modified is bad,” for “bad” is a quality of substance. But rather, “genetically modified is a construct of illusion.”

Knowing this leaves us, the consumers, empowered to buy foods of substance, to demand which seeds are sown, and to decide which landscapes are to be grown.

Global Walker

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland. He can be contacted at walker@globalwhisperer.com

Rethinking Construction – Low Impact Building

September 30, 2010

Simon Dale House Built in Wales

From the outside, it looked like a large hobbit house held as a timeless showcase of fascination. It was tucked halfway within the hillside, the roof the same natural bouquet of mixed grasses and wildflowers found throughout the surrounding landscape. A greenhouse attached to the home dwelling, and running the length of the front outside wall, housed the shower at one end, next to the sunflowers. Everything was curved and arched—the doorframe, the front patio, the rim of the roof. A glance inside of the house revealed not just as an aesthetically awarding structure, but also a true masterpiece of architecture. It was a roundhouse, a large open space with only partially divided rooms. The design formally known as a reciprocal roof is a self-supporting structure in which the tree poles run atop each other, forming a spiral-type shape as the ceiling. No nails, no bolts or screws, no centerpiece supports. Just the bodies of trees with a wild garden on top.

Wales Organic House

Frame Up for the House

Nothing about this house is traditional. But then everything about it is. It is just outside the traditions of our time. More than a building of walls and windows and a roof, it is a construct of intelligence and integrity, ingenuity and sensitivity. It is the home of Simon Dale, a resident of the Lammas Project, the first authorized low-impact ecovillage of Wales. He has built other homes before, but says he built his first with nearly no prior experience in construction or architecture. In fact, nearly every builder on the nine plots into which Lammas is divided says the same thing: they don’t have much building experience, if any at all; they are simply inspired to design and create a higher standard of home.
Simon Dale and the Lammas Project

Now, this is an interesting concept that we could apply to many areas. What if we could design and construct and provide for ourselves with the materials that we knew, and the labor that we could gather? In terms of one’s dwelling place, rather than it being built for us with materials that are literally as harsh as a mild hazardous wasteland with more carcinogens than a metropolis highway, why not build with what the woodland provides? Here, follow the logic if it is clear enough. If we work days and weeks and months in order to pay for the things we need or want, and then realize that we actually have the ability and capability to provide the things that we need or want for ourselves, and can actually do it better, why not downsize the line of complexity, and do it ourselves? What is really stopping the masses from doing this? I believe it has to do with the way we see, as well as how we are accustomed to the conventional labels of value.

Organic House Construction

I am not suggesting that we must all become natural builders or organic farmers. This would be a tragedy in itself. It would establish the monoculture of conventional farming as the monoculture of human culture. What I am suggesting is that we look beyond the present boundary of sight, beyond just the house with walls and windows and a roof, beyond just the groceries we prepare our meals with, beyond just the clothing we wear or products we are adorned convenience with. When our sight ends at these things, then their value is determined on how well they are performing, and how well they are servicing us. The best way I think to describe this is a “shallowness of sight,” which is not to say that we are “shallow” people in that sense, but that we rarely see further than what the image portrays. It becomes far too difficult to imagine the trees beyond the timber, the forest beyond the trees, the land beyond the forest, and the weathers and seasons and history beyond the land. And it seems impractical to do so, for we would spend our entire days imagining these things. What needs to happen is for us to pull back the curtain on what the image portrays. This would require seeing things in their true value, which would be breaking the mold of subjective value and monetary value.

Organic Construction View of the Kitchen

Now, the critic of this suggestion may counter, “But I paid for these things. And I worked darn hard so I could pay for them.” This is a respectful claim, but the problem is that the land and its resources have not adopted our exchange currency of value. The prices we pay are the “shallow” prices. They meet only a very little portion of the product’s true value. Our sight is limited only because we have accepted that the market value is the true value. A house is not built with money, we know this. This is common sense, but it is also revelation. Because again, nothing about the land operates this way. The only real currency that the land knows is the currency of good use. So, when our standard of home becomes only a standard of good use, our kitchens and bedrooms are no longer painted with hazardous chemicals, but are comprised of integrity and ingenuity.

From this standpoint, projects such as building your own home becomes not just a do-it-yourself occupation that simplifies the process of attaining the things we need or want, but actually gets much closer to its true value, and adopts a clearer appreciation for that value.

For more information on Simon Dale and the Lammas Project please visit Simondale.net

Global Walker

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland. He can be contacted at walker@globalwhisperer.com

Rethinking Education in the Highlands

September 19, 2010

Scotland Education

Science. Mathematics. English. History. Language. These are the conventionally
accepted lynch pins of a proper education. And they spoon out little more than what
is found in a textbook. But if we could renovate this current format, and infuse these
subjects with Creativity, Imagination, and Experiment, we would see a progression in
society further than once imagined.

At Culdees Ecovillage, where I currently live and work, there are plans to eventually
establish a new education system. The hope is to welcome families into the community,
and provide the children with an education beyond the textbook model. It would teach
not the program of intellect, but provide a basis for innovative thinking.

Education Scotland

Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world

There are no students enrolled yet.

Currently, education produces imitation. In the classroom, there is a set criterion, a kind of standard of knowledge that is followed, in which whatever is taught has already been
learned. This doesn’t really teach thinking. We all end up just imitating what the other
knows. In this model of education, our own creativity and imagination are exchanged
for what has been realized by the creativity and imagination from others in the past.
This belittles what the human mind is still capable of, and brings a kind of stagnation to
thinking. If the classroom model of thought was never broken, if the limited perception
of possible knowledge was never overturned, then Newton, Shakespeare, Einstein, and
Goethe, would never have realized their own potential.

What is lacking in the current system is room for experiment, room for imagination
and mistake…

A common theme of mainstream education says, “Here are the laws of science. They
have been prescribed for you. Take them so you can better understand the world.”

Whereas a great educator or education system might say, “Here are so-called ‘laws of
science’ so far. Take them so you can disprove them, build upon and strengthen them, or
throw them away in pursuit of something better.”

So, this isn’t to imply that we should do away with “the system” of education all
together. There is a basis of knowledge that is important or at least helpful to know. But
if everything is presented as “knowledge of the commons,” there is really no reason to
continue learning how to stay common. There certainly isn’t any inspiration to do so.
What is lacking in the current system is room for experiment, room for imagination
and mistake. Experiment not in the science classroom sense, in which the outcome is
already known, but in the sense of conducting something new and unknown. From the
experiment of imagination come mistakes. The discovery of the law of gravity wasn’t a
one-time hypothesis-to-conclusion deal; it was a series of tests and revisions that used the
mistakes as a rising step towards its newly discovered conclusion. The mistakes aren’t
even thought of as mistakes; they are understood as part of the process of learning. This
is an approach to learning beyond what the textbook already tells us.

At Culdees, whatever new approach to education it takes, it will be an experiment. And
mistakes will naturally follow. But from these mistakes, hopefully a finely tuned model
of education will develop.

Eco Village

In the current model of mainstream education, the validity of an original thought depends much on what has been said prior. Take for example school papers. If a student writes
a paper on some particular theme, it is regarded appropriate to quote the statements of
other known and respected individuals. In fact, it is encouraged to quote what others have
said. Actually, it is often required to quote what others have said. If I were to refer to
Einstein’s statement about imagination verses knowledge, in which, “Imagination is more
important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world,” my
argument suddenly seems more valid, more credited.

This style of education continues on and on until finally the entire enterprise of what
we know, what we think, and what we think we know becomes one big quote. But if a
student could use not just his own words, but also manifest his own thoughts to clarify
and conclude an original argument, he would become the success of true education.

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland.

Ownership, A Japanese Monk, and Why Your Lawn is an Illusion

September 7, 2010

Culdees Eco-village in Fearnan, Scotland.

One man's thoughts, living and working in Culdees Eco-village in Fearnan, Scotland.

There is an underlying principle regarding our place of living. It states that the land on which we reside, we take ownership of. Ownership conduces authority, and authority determines a conflict of interest.

Living and Working in the Culdees

Living and Working in the Culdees

I work and live at Culdees Eco-village in Fearnan, Scotland. I have been here just three weeks now, and my stay is undetermined. The community is not yet a self-sustaining zero-waste village as it hopes to become, but every day more planning and labor by the residents and volunteers forward its evolution. Salvaged caravans are being renovated and insulated for the coming winter months. Three yurts (large tentlike dwellings) that are made with ash wood from the neighboring forest are nearing their final stages of completion. A Japanese monk who is a permanent resident of the community is building a natural water-flow system using a stream to keep his stored vegetables cool. One greenhouse and one polytunnel are already in place, and grow various vegetables and fruits and herbs. Numerous other gardens and beds and chicken coops populate the area. There are plans to build three more polytunnels as well as additional housing structures that would feed and shelter the growing number of residents. And though much building has finished and much more is planned to begin, there is an underlying principle to all the construction in the community: the land and resources used are not the sole ownership of the people in the community; they are profitably shared amongst the entire biotic community*.

Lawns are green deserts, vast monocultures that require immense amounts of water and fertilizer, and support little life beyond the grass itself.

This is an underlying principle of living that nature has successfully demonstrated since the beginning of life on Earth. We too can grow abundantly from such an integral standpoint. No significant sacrifices are needed, just a sharply different approach when compared to modern convention. I say “modern” convention because today’s industrious style of living is a very new tradition. We have only been agriculturalists for 0.5% of humanity’s time on Earth, the rest we hunted and gathered as we needed. And with the free time gained from bringing our food to us rather than going to look for it, we have been able to advance in other areas led by our curiosity. With the further exploration and advancement of our capabilities, the originating attitudes that we are part of the “biotic community” have dissolved into new trains of thought. Rene Descartes, the father of modern philosophy, taught us that the world is a machine without any real substance. Scripture speaks of our dominion over other living things. Human authority contradicts nature’s authority.

More than industry and technology have developed from our capabilities; a hierarchy of life, an authority over “the other” has also developed. This is not to say that agriculture itself is destructive, or that tool making and technology are unsustainable, but that the founding principle of these modern practices is not holistic.

A simple, easy-to-understand example is our grass lawns. They beautify our homes, and bring a pleasurable tone of nature back into our lives. However, when we look at grass lawns in their very essence, they are illusions of nature. They are green deserts, vast monocultures that require immense amounts of water and fertilizer, and support little life beyond the grass itself. They are scattered across suburban neighborhoods, and suggest that nature is domesticated, and designed by man. This traces back to the perception that nature is property, and can be used without exhaustion.

The claim that we must sacrifice our lawns because they are not “natural” enough is harshly unattractive. But think of it this way: when a continent’s worth of land is converted from natural prairie to grass lawns, where do all the vital resources go that sustain us?

honeybee

If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live. - Albert Einstein

Consider just one example. In the United States, bee populations decreased by 30% in 2006 and in 2007, and continue to decline today. While more of their natural habit is exchanged for grass lawns, there is less “home” for them to live and populate. And bees pollinate about 80% of the plants we eat.

Albert Einstein said, “If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live.” So, it is not just by the grace of good sympathy that we should allow bees a return to residence.
The possible disappearance of bees is enough reason for change. What if land disappears? Or water?
Without change, there will be no hospitable Earth to carry dominion over.

At Culdees Eco-Village, community reaches beyond the walls of our buildings; it reaches wider than the relations between the people working and living here. The template of thought begins with the understanding that nature is property of itself.
The wilderness of the Scottish landscape does not stop at the front gate, but continues through our gardens and around our buildings. More than just the potatoes we grow for food and the flowers we grow for beauty, the property grows as a biotic community. There is an aesthetic in the wild beyond what is possible through the domestic. The land holds ownership over itself; it has an authority to grow. Landscape is the home, and we are temporary residents.

*This principle is my interpretation of the work on Culdees, not a directly quoted view.

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland.

Human Renovation

September 1, 2010

Culdees Eco-Village

Loch Sheil in the Scottish Highlands

Innovation lies at the core of humanity’s growth. It brings reason and purpose to our race. Its landmarks, from automobiles, to computers, to spacecraft, lie just about everywhere you look. They are the proof of our capability. But as our devices become quicker and more compact, inevitable questions arise—how much further? and, what else is there to innovate?

Amidst the present day paradigm of ‘innovate or die’, we are entering the age of a new human challenge ‘renovate or die.’ The last two hundred years of industrial development, put us face to face with humanity’s harsh treatment of planet Earth. Global climate change is at the center stage of attention; the loss of biodiversity is at such a great rate that scientists are calling this the Sixth Great Extinction the world has ever known, the last being the extinction of the dinosaurs; hundreds of ‘dead zones’ rim the continents because of agriculture runoff; genetic engineering devastates the natural course of evolution.

For pessimists, this is an age of unsolvable crises. For optimists, and maybe even opportunists, this is a moment for the most sweeping innovation.

For pessimists, this is an age of unsolvable crises. For optimists, and maybe even opportunists, this is a moment for the most sweeping innovation. Solutions are already surfacing. The most successful models are using an entirely new template of innovation. In other words, the thinking and intentions behind the design are innovative.

The greatest innovation is the human renovation. It involves a complete redesign of design itself. Rather than making our music players smaller, and endowing our phones with further Internet access, we need to design and build social structures and economic systems that replicate nature’s model.

What does such a drastic change look like?

Ecological communities.

When the term ‘ecological community’ is used, most likely one imagines a richly diverse eco-system of plants and animals coexisting. For human living, ecological communities are no different. But more is necessary than installing solar panels and driving a ‘green’ car. Nature cycles and recycles all of its waste back into productive use. What if tomorrow we were forced to do the same? Nature grows not so much because of competition, but because of cooperation. What if we could think further than the next shareholder’s meeting? What if our living systems could self-propagate and grow each season?

The correlation between the people’s disconnection from one another, and our perceived disconnection from the natural environment, is no coincidence.

These are the types of questions that designers of ecological communities, or ‘ecovillages,’ wrestle with. In place of purchasing heavily packaged and processed foods from grocery stores, varieties are grown within the property bounds of the community or village. Since nature’s ‘agriculture’ is always growing in wide variety, designers of these villages often model a similar approach—permanent agriculture, or permaculture. Permaculture is a cooperative system of growing and raising one’s food source, in which the system begins to operate itself without the use of synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. Further than providing for one’s food source, ecovillages must establish systems for modern transportation, building structure and expansion, consumer necessities and conveniences, education, and sometimes even monetary exchange. A successful ecovillage is truly the prize of innovation.

To create a caring community, at one with the natural environment

The design of a fully operational ecovillage begins from a different foundation than that of conventional towns and cities. And more than the concrete foundation is different. The designer’s paradigm must be a radical shift from the old to the new. Truly what it comes down to is perception—how humanity perceives itself amongst its natural environment. For example, it is not the climate crisis that needs protocols and policies in place, so much as it is the crisis of perception that needs aligning. Aligning our perception means to see the products of nature not with the lens of economic potential, but with their intrinsic value.

On nature’s stage, community is the main player. Competition is seen on the surface, say, when two dominant male buffalos challenge each other for a mate. But in truth, cooperation within nature’s community is essential for growth. For example, the decay and decomposition of organic matter, what we see on the surface as mushrooms and fungi, cycles back nourishment into the soils for new growth.

Within most ecovillages that have already sprung up around the world, cooperation is understood as the operation of the community. Everyone contributes for the benefit of the whole.
In a metropolitan center of five million people, where everybody owns and uses the most ‘innovative’ music players and cell phones, where white earplugs are always hooked in, and cell phones are always attached to the ear, the sense of community is lost. The correlation between the people’s disconnection from one another, and our perceived disconnection from the natural environment, is no coincidence.

If we can use our innovative capabilities to promote collective and sustained growth, we will be able to design self-operative communities that resemble nature’s model. With this new paradigm of innovation, we can return to the sense of community, and restore the last two hundred years of human imprint.

Global Whisperer Guy Walker is currently living and working in the Culdees Eco-Village in Scotland.